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Pinedale Online > News > September 2011 > Tour of the Jonah and NPL

Jonah Field. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Jonah Field
The Jonah Field began in the 1990s in a desert area that previously was just used for cattle grazing, measured in acres per cow.

Safety Meeting. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Safety Meeting
Before going onto any rig site, visitors must put on a flame retardant jump suit and wear a hard hat, safety glasses, ear plugs, foot protection, and listen to a safety briefing from Chris House, EnCana Jonah Field Production Coordinator.

Drill rig. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Drill rig
"We are all extremely proud of our rigs," said Encana GIS Analyst Randal Phillips from the Denver office. "I challenge if we didn't have the best fleet of rigs in the United States." The tour visited Ensign drill rig #129 which had Schlumberger subcontractors onsite doing drilling work.

Rig tour. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Rig tour

Drill Bits. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Drill Bits
Drill bits are tungsten cutters with diamond insets attached. They can weigh between 75-250 pounds each. One bit can cost as much as $48,000. Sometimes they can be refurbished and reused, but often the company is lucky to drill one well without destroying at least one bit.

Old and new drill bits. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Old and new drill bits

Dog House. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Dog House
Rick Felker explains the monitors and controls in the "dog house".

Burner. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
Burner
The NPL field will be a contrast to the Jonah Field utilizing much more modern and efficient technology. Equipment in the Jonah is being upgraded as time progresses to reduce air emissions and modernize the equipment.
Tour of the Jonah and NPL
Natural gas fields south of Pinedale
by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online!
September 5, 2011

Encana Oil & Gas USA, Inc. gave a tour of their operations in the Jonah natural gas field and their proposed NPL field on Wednesday, August 31st. The purpose was to give members of the public an opportunity to see their current operations and the proposed new gas field. Company representatives were on hand to answer questions.

Encana is a natural gas exploration and development company from Canada that has significant operations in North America. They operate in a number of North America's shale and tight gas resource plays in Wyoming, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana and Canada. In Wyoming, they hold approximately 80% of the gas leases in the Jonah Natural Gas Field located approximately 32 miles south of Pinedale and 65 miles north of Rock Springs.

The Jonah Field
Located south of Pinedale, Wyoming, the Jonah Field is the earliest natural gas field in the Upper Green River Basin in Sublette County. It is estimated to contain 10.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. The resource is on federal land managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

The presence of natural gas in and around Sublette County was known for years, but it was not deemed practical to extract. The principal technical challenge in Jonah was and is identification and stimulation of productive intervals in a 3,000 ft to 3,500 ft section of stacked lenticular fluvial sand/silt/shale sequences which include the Upper Mesaverde, Lance, and Unnamed Tertiary formations. The formation is bounded by two faults which create a wedge shape for the formation underground.

The Jonah Field took off after McMurry Oil proved the field viable after drilling wells and using the hydraulic fracturing process to open (stimulate) the tight sand formations that exist more than a mile and a half underground, which allows gas to be recovered at economic rates.

Jonah Field is known for being one of the largest on-shore natural gas discoveries in the USA in the early 1990s. It is one of Encanaís key resource plays. In 2010, Encana drilled approximately 112 net wells in their Jonah operations. According to Encana, productive area of Jonah is approximately 18,100 acres - just under one township in size. Encana owns approximately 80% of the lease rights in the Jonah Field.

The life of the Jonah Field is estimated to be from 40 to 60 years. The drilling program is winding down with only 300 - 400 wells left to drill in Jonah. The existing wells should produce for another 30 to 40 years, at a declining rate. Encana is looking to adjacent land for a new gas field for their activities.

NPL
The Normally Pressured Lance (NPL) region encompasses 141,080 acres immediately south and west of the existing Jonah Field. Encana currently holds mineral leases on more than 70 percent of this area. The field is called "normally pressured" because the gas flows at pressure rates deemed normal for the depth at which the gas occurs, as opposed to the nearby Jonah Field and Pinedale Anticline where the gas is over pressure than typically occurs at those depths.

The NPL is outside of the geologic formation, a wedge-shape bounded by two faults, which encompasses the Jonah Field. NPL wells arenít quite as good as those found in the Jonah, but they are still economically attractive enough to go after as a new gas play. Encana will use a directional drilling technology strategy learned from the nearby Pinedale Anticline gas field, rather than all straight vertical drilling, to minimize their surface footprint and environmental impacts.

Long-term development plans for the proposed NPL includes a maximum of 3,500 wells to be drilled over 10 years to produce natural gas from the Lance Pool, Unnamed Tertiary and Mesa Verde formations.

Encana filed their Notice of Intent on April 12, 2011. The Scoping Period for public comment ended on May 12, 2011. Presently, Encana is in the process of preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Once that is available, hopefully next spring, there will be another 45-day public comment period. Those comments will be included and considered in the Final EIS. Encana hopes to begin operations in the NPL in 2013.
Source: http://www.encana.com/operations/activities/npl/docs/npl-fact-sheet.pdf

If approved and successful, the NPL project will provide continuous steady jobs as drilling in Jonah winds down. This would allow Encana operational planning and development, and Wyoming communities would be able to keep steady jobs and tax revenues, Encana says. Entry-level jobs typically start at around $24/hour. Experienced rig hands can make $32/hour or more, said Rick Felker, who works with the Encana in the Jonah Field Simops (simultaneous operations) Completion activities.

The NPL will utilize several of the operational lessons learned from the Jonah and nearby Pinedale Anticline fields:

- Directional drilling to consolidate numerous wells onto a single well pad which minimizes surface impacts.
- Utilization of a closed-loop, three-phase underground gathering system to ship gas, water and condensate to centralized processing facilities located in the gas field. This significantly reduces truck traffic through, and in and out of the gas field. Efforts to reduce truck traffic are estimated to have eliminated 1 million truck trips a year in the Jonah Field in Encanaís operations.
- Utilization of an on-site workforce housing facility, commonly referred to as a "man camp" for their employees, sub-contractors and company associates.
- 24-hour/day drilling and simultaneous operations to reduce the time it takes to drill and complete a well.
- Electrification of the gas field. The large natural gas operators are working with Pacific Power and the BLM to bring in electric lines to run power to all the facilities in the gas field, which should significantly improve air quality from gas field equipment.

Safety, Safety, Safety
Encana Natural Gas company representatives stress that safety is their #1 priority in all their operations. They have a zero-tolerance policy for drugs, alcohol or firearms. They built a work force facility adjacent to the gas field to house their employees and subcontractors. No dogs are allowed in the Jonah. "Safety isnít just a priority," said Chris House, EnCana Jonah Field Production Coordinator, "it is one of our core values." Visitors going on the gas-field tour had to listen to a safety talk, then don fire-retardant jump suits, put "clinkers" on their shoes, and wear hardhats and safety glasses. All participants had to sign a Safety and Environmental Briefing document after the safety talk before they were allowed to go on the Jonah tour. It was explained that even cell phones and cameras can be potentially dangerous because they could interfere with radio communications between operations at the site by accidentally accepting or sending transmissions of onsite drilling, fracturing or completion equipment.

For more information about Encanaís operations in the Jonah Field or NPL, please contact:
Randy Phillips, Encana NPL EIS Project Manager
720-876-3692
Paul Ulrich, Encana NPL EIS Project Lead
(720) 876-3554
Randy Teeuwen, Encana Public & Community Relations Advisor
720-876-5468



Related Links
  • NPL Fact Sheet (PDF)
  • www.encana.com - Encana Oil & Gas USA, Inc.
  • www.ensignusd.com - Ensign United States Drilling Inc.
  • www.slb.com - Schlumberger

  • Clackers. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Clackers
    "Clackers" are metal toe caps worn over shoes to protect feet while working on a drill rig site. All tour visitors had to put these on over their street shoes. They are called clackers because of the noise they make walking on the metal drill rig stairs and corridors.

    Clackers. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Clackers

    Safety Release. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Safety Release
    Everyone had to listen to the safety briefing, then sign the Safety sheet saying they have read, understand, and agree to abide by the requirements and responsibilities listed in the Jonah site specific safety and environmental briefing. The 25-point briefing covered accidents, injuries, fall protection, clothing, smoking, wildlife, horeseplay, tools, photographic devices, housekeeping, driving, firearms, explosives, weaponds, working in extreme temperatures and other operations. "You have the authority and responsibility to stop any unsafe operation."

    Shuttle Bus. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Shuttle Bus
    Workers, and tour visitors, are moved around in these shuttle busses. They hold 25 people each and help to significantly reduce the amount of vehicle traffic moving around the gas field. Shuttle services are provided by Sublink Stage.

    Well signs. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Well signs
    Rig signs All the wells are signed with their name, number, location, lease number and emergency contact information.

    Signing into the drill site. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Signing into the drill site
    Everyone who goes on a drill site must sign in and out.

    Wind sock. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Wind sock
    All the sites have wind socks to let workers know the direction of the wind in case of an emergency.

    Muster areas. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Muster areas
    Each drill pad has two emergency muster areas on opposite sides of the pad, for gathering areas for workers to stay upwind in case of an emergency.

    Ensign Rig 129. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Ensign Rig 129
    Encana contracts with third party suppliers to provide the drill rigs and do the drilling and completion work. Encana does not own any of the drill rigs. This rig is run by Ensign. Operations are controlled from the "dog house", a small room on the rig floor used for the drilling control operations.

    Drill Rig. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drill Rig
    Much of the work on the rig floor has been automated, making it much safer for rig workers. However, someone still has to climb the rig tower daily, summer and winter while it is in operation, to do maintance. This requires special safety rigging to protect from falls.

    Are you tied off?. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Are you tied off?
    Warning signs warn workers when there are hazardous conditions nearby. Workers must be connected to safety ropes before climbing the drill rig.

    Drilling pipe. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drilling pipe
    During the drilling process, the pipe segments are staged on a platform near the rig, then drawn up automatically as each segment is needed as the hole is dug deeper into the ground. Ultimately, this rig will drill to a depth of around 13,000 feet to reach the natural gas layers.

    Lifting up. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Lifting up
    The elevator lifts the pipe up and moves it into position.

    Up and over. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Up and over
    The pipe is lifted up and fitted onto the pipe that is already in the ground.

    Next pipe. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Next pipe
    The "mule" lifts and moves the next piece of pipe automatically into position on the feeder of the drill rig during drilling.

    Feeding the pipe. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Feeding the pipe
    The feeder automatically moves the next segment of pipe into position on the rig. A lot of automation has been implemented in the last ten years eliminating much of the manual labor, and danger, that used to be part of the work on the drill rig.

    Drill pipe. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drill pipe
    Rick Felker explains the different kinds of drill pipe used to drill the gas well.

    Pipe fitting. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Pipe fitting

    Drill line. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drill line
    Drill line control cable is fed in during the drilling process.

    Drilling. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drilling
    This is where the pipe is being drilled into the ground.

    Non-potable water. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Non-potable water

    Drilling water. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drilling water
    Water is mixed with mud to aid the drilling process. This water is cleaned and used over and over again.

    Drill rig platform. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drill rig platform
    The drill rig floor is a metal platform over the top of various tanks and equipment. It takes 4 to 6 people to operate the rig in the drilling process.

    Separating the cuttings. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Separating the cuttings
    The cuttings are the solids removed from the borehole during the well-drilling process. It is usually made up of sands, shales and the other rock encountered as the drill bit moves through the underground rock formations. The drill cuttings are removed by circulating the drilling fluid over shale shakers. The shaker typically consists of large, flat sheets of wire mesh screens or sieves of various mesh sizes that shake or vibrate the drill cuttings across and off of the screens as the drilling fluid mud flows through them and back into the drilling fluid system. This separates the solid drill cuttings from the fluid so that it can be recirculated back down the wellbore.

    Jumping cuttings. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Jumping cuttings
    The cuttings jump up along the vibrating shaker and are separated from the drilling fluid mud.

    Cuttings. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Cuttings
    Million-year old dirt remains after the shaking process.

    Mud. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Mud
    Pallets of bags of drilling mud are use in the drilling process.

    High Noise areas. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    High Noise areas
    Workers wear earplugs for ear protection in high noise areas.

    The brain. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    The brain
    The control room is the brain of the rig operation.

    Plugged in. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Plugged in
    The brain is plugged into the drill rig.

    Danger sign. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Danger sign

    Pressure gauges. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Pressure gauges

    Accountability. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Accountability
    Ensign sign: Accountability means: You see it. You own it. Take care of it.

    Dog House. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Dog House
    Rick Felker explains the monitors and controls in the "dog house".

    Monitors. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Monitors

    Joystick controls. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Joystick controls
    The older generation drillers kid the younger generation about the computerized joystick controls in the modern drill rigs, similar to the controls on the computer games many of the new workers grew up on and are very familiar with using.

    Game Boy Drill Rigs. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Game Boy Drill Rigs
    The kids playing computer games today will feel right at home when they move into a job in the control room of a drill rig.

    Control monitor. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Control monitor
    The drill bit is a 9,108 feet depth in the wellbore of Stud Horse Butte 121-9. It will drill down to about 13,000 feet in all, which will take 3-4 more days. The technology has advanced so much in the past 10 years it takes just 10-12 days to drill a well now. It used to take 95-120 days.

    Camera monitors. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Camera monitors

    Drill pipe. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drill pipe
    View of the pipe pick up from the dog house. So much is automated now on the drill rigs, employees work in a much safer environment than the old days. The reality-TV show "Black Gold, " which chronicles three oil drilling rigs in Andrews County, Texas, has done a lot to damage public perception about the reality of the high safety standards on the new generation gas drilling rigs used in Wyoming.

    Danger, Caution, Danger. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Danger, Caution, Danger

    1377 days without an accident. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    1377 days without an accident
    Ensign Rig#129 has worked 1377 days without a recordable accident.

    Restroom. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Restroom
    The company manager and geologist live in trailers on the site and stay full-time. All the equipment is industrial scale and modular, so it can be packed up and moved over to the next drilling site.

    Erosion control. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Erosion control

    No dumping. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    No dumping
    Everything is well signed throughout the field with caution warnings and identification signs.

    Authorized Personnel Only. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Authorized Personnel Only

    300-400 more to go. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    300-400 more to go
    The drilling program is winding down with only 300 - 400 wells left to drill in Jonah. The existing wells should produce for another 30 to 40 years, at a declining rate. The NPL will be located adjacent to the Jonah, allowing Encana to utilize a lot of their existing infrastructure.

    Jonah. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Jonah

    Jonah. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Jonah

    Jonah. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Jonah

    Jonah. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Jonah

    Jonah. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Jonah

    Drill truck. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drill truck
    Drilling a water well? We're not quite sure what is going on in this photo, but the truck looked very interestingly positioned.

    Communications tower. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Communications tower
    The blobs at the bottom and about halfway up this tower are maintenance workers.

    Tower climber. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Tower climber

    Camoflauge. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Camoflauge
    A lot of work has been put in to try and find colors and patterns to make the structures on the gas fields blend in and be less visible on the landscape.

    Solar powered. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Solar powered
    Right now, power is provided by solar panels, generators and other kinds of engines. Pacific Power is putting in powerlines that eventually with electrify the entire Jonah Field. That is expected to significantly cut down emissions that are causing ozone and air quality issues.

    Central Delivery Facility. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Central Delivery Facility

    Spill containmemt. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Spill containmemt
    A stock watering tank serves a new purpose acting as a spill catch basin for tanks at well sites. Wire mesh is placed ver the top to keep birds and other animals from getting into the tank.

    Water truck. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Water truck
    Water trucks keep the dirt roads watered to keep down the dust.

    Bridger Compressor Station. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Bridger Compressor Station
    Product is piped to this central gathering facility where it is pumped into pipelines to go to market.

    Randal Phillips. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Randal Phillips
    Randal Phillips, Encana EIS Project Manager, said the company is working with the Bureau of Land Management and Rocky Mountain Power to bring electric power to their facilities in the Jonah and the NPL. Electricity will eliminate the need to burn natural gas or other fuels that create emissions that may contribute to air quality concerns.

    Workforce Facility. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Workforce Facility

    Workforce facility. Photo by DAwn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Workforce facility

    Workforce Facility. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Workforce Facility
    The Workforce Facility houses nearly 300 people, including Encana company people, subcontractor employees and staff. It has dorm rooms, a dining hall, rec center, offices, and outdoor recreation areas. It has its own power plant and water treatment complex. Entrance and exit is through a gated security check station. The complex has no alcohol, drugs, firearms or dogs.

    No grass. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    No grass
    All of the buildings in the Workforce Facility are modular and will be hauled off once they are no longer needed. The outsides don't have grass or landscaping. The insides have all of the comforts of home, and more.

    Dorm Hallway. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Dorm Hallway

    First Aid Station. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    First Aid Station
    First aid stations are located in the hallways of the dorm trailers.

    Dorm room. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Dorm room
    Workers get their own private room which includes a bed, desk, closet, and 19-inch flat screen TV. The complex has internet access.

    Flatscreen TV. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Flatscreen TV
    Each dorm room has a 19" flat screen TV.

    Closet. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Closet
    Each dorm room has a closet for putting clothes.

    Hall phone. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Hall phone
    Phones are located in the dorm hallways.

    Hall bathroom. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Hall bathroom
    Bathrooms and showers are located in the dorm trailers.

    Washers and Dryers. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Washers and Dryers
    Each dorm trailer has a laundry room with washers and dryers. These are free to use.

    Dining Room. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Dining Room
    In addition to giving the tour of the gas field, Encana let the tour group eat at the Workforce Center dining room and try the camp food. (It was delicious.) Sometimes the menu includes BBQ meals.

    Booties. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Booties
    Members of the public tour put on booties over their shoes in the Workforce facility dining room, just like the workers have to, in order to keep the carpet clean.

    Dining Room. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Dining Room

    Dinner. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Dinner
    This meal includes pasta, broccoli, sloppy joes and onion rings and ranch toast. Additional food, salads, breads and desserts were in the coolers.

    Dining Room. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Dining Room

    Serving area. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Serving area
    Dining room serving area.

    Drink center. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drink center

    Salad Bar. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Salad Bar

    Steak and hot sauces. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Steak and hot sauces

    Grab n Go coolers. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Grab n Go coolers
    Workers can grab whatever they want and as much as they want from the dining room, and it's free to them.

    Desserts. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Desserts

    Desserts. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Desserts

    Grab n Gos. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Grab n Gos
    Stir fry, poppers, Chicken Cordon Bleu, chimichanga, chicken strips, chicken floutas, pizza, corn dogs, egg rolls, macaroni & cheese, taquitos, kielbasa...

    Sandwiches. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Sandwiches
    Ham, roast beef, turkey sandwichs, hotdogs...

    Fruit. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Fruit

    Yogurt and pudding. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Yogurt and pudding

    Drinks. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Drinks

    Salads and boiled eggs. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Salads and boiled eggs

    Bulletin board. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Bulletin board
    Bulletin boards post information and notices. This one has information about laundry pick-up and delivery and the Workforce Facility Water Quality report.

    Popcorn. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Popcorn
    There's even a popcorn machine in the dining room for a snack.

    Rec Room. Photo by Dawn Ballou, Pinedale Online.
    Rec Room
    We didn't have time to go into the Rec Room in the Workforce Facility on this tour, so we don't have pictures to show you of the interior. But we can relay that the Rec Room has a variety of exercise equipment, ping pong tables, large screen TVs, lounge chairs and tables, and computers for internet access.
     
    Pinedale Online > News > September 2011 > Tour of the Jonah and NPL

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